Wall Definition

@SHAPE_BUILDER_ANALYSIS {
@SHAPE_BUILDER_NAME {WallName} {
@SHAPE_GROUP {COMPONENT}
@SHAPE_TYPE {WALL}
@DIMENSIONS {
@DIMENSION_01 {c}
@DIMENSION_02 {t}
}
@MATERIALS {
@MATERIAL_01 {Mat1}
}
@CURVE_NAME {CurveName}
@NUMBER_OF_CONTROL_POINTS {Ncp}
@IS_DEFINED_IN_FRAME {FrameName}
@MESH_DENSITY {md}
@COMMENTS {CommentText}
}
}

Notes

  • ShapeBuilder can generate beam cross-sections in the shape of a thin wall. Typically, the thin wall is a components of a more complex cross section that involves several components. To define a wall, use the following parameters.
    1. @SHAPE_GROUP: WALLED_OPEN, and
    2. @SHAPE_TYPE: WALL.

    Figure 1 shows the configuration of a wall. It consists of a quadrangular area whose configuration conforms to the curve, CurveName, that defines the shape of on of its sides. The unit tangent and normal vectors to the curve are denoted t and n, respectively. Typically, the wall is a “thin wall”, i.e., the length of the wall along the curve is far larger than its thickness along unit vector n.

    Figure 1. Configuration of a wall.

    Lay-ups are used to define the structural properties of beams, plates, and shells.

    1. SectionBuilder uses lay-ups to define the cross-sectional characteristics beams made of possibly heterogeneous anisotropic material, see solid property definitions.
    2. NormalBuilder uses lay-ups to define the characteristics of plates and shells made of possibly heterogeneous anisotropic material.

    Notes

    • It is not uncommon for lay-ups to be made of a single material but the various layers have different orientation angle. In such case, it is convenient to define an optional default material properties, MatPropName, and an optional default layer thickness, t.
    • Each layer of the lay-up is defined in its own subsection starting with the keyword @LAYER_DEFINITION. The first subsection defines Layer 1, the last Layer N. The order in which the subsections appear defines the stacking sequence of the lay-up. The following conventions apply.
      • If the thickness, ti, of a layer is omitted, the default value, t, is used.
      • If the material properties, MatPropNamei, of a layer are omitted, the default value, material properties, MatPropName are used.
      • The orientation angles, βi and γi, must be defined as no default values are provided.
    • Because materials can present anisotropic stiffness and strength properties, the orientation of each layer must be specified accurately. Material properties are defined with respect to a material basis. Orientation angles βi and γi determine the orientation of this material basis with respect to the global reference basis.
      1. If the lay-up is used to define the sectional properties of beams via solid element properties, the procedure to determine the relative orientation of the material basis with respect to the global basis is presented here.
      2. If the lay-up is used to define the properties of plates and shells, the procedure to determine the relative orientation of the material basis with respect to the global basis is presented below.
    • It is possible to attach comments to the definition of the object; these comments have no effect on its definition.